Five Myths About Admissions Tests

Tests like the SAT and ACT are almost universally reviled by those who deem the tests not only worthless and self-referential but also key agents in educational inequality. But does the evidence actually support those bold claims? Amy and Mike invited author and academic Freddie deBoer to dispel five myths about standardized tests.

What are five things you will learn in this episode?

  1. Aren’t admissions exams just wealth tests?
  2. Can superior test scores be bought?
  3. Do SAT and ACT scores really predict college success?
  4. Is it true that the SATs only tell you how well a student takes the SAT.
  5. Is it true that test optional policies increase racial diversity at colleges?

MEET OUR GUEST

Freddie deBoer is a writer and academic. He is the author of the book The Cult of Smart. He lives in Brooklyn.

Find Freddie at https://freddiedeboer.substack.com/.

LINKS

You Aren’t Actually Mad at the SATs

RELATED EPISODES

WHY GRADE INFLATION IS HARMFUL
HOW SAT AND ACT SCORES HIGHLIGHT EDUCATIONAL INEQUITY
DO TEST OPTIONAL POLICIES DRIVE EQUITY?

ABOUT THIS PODCAST

Tests and the Rest is THE college admissions industry podcast. Explore all of our episodes on the show page.

1 comment

Freddie has the data, the training, and the experience to, at the very least, challenge the Common Wisdom about what the SAT/ACT measures. He is, of course, facing a huge uphill battle. Major media have little to no interest in making this an issue worth discussing. Traditional outlets do not wish to enter a discussion in which the Common Wisdom would be asked to provide data that convincingly disproves what Freddie and the UC faculty published. I have seen no articles by any experts that even remotely undermine the study by UC faculty. But, as we know this did not matter, since the UC went on to get rid of considering these test in any way. As you both know I have lots to say about this issue. I learned a great deal. Thank you for inviting him on your show.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *